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Glossary of parameters

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Models

Found 120 parameters

  1. Total cloud cover

    0-6-1

    Fraction of horizontal grid square occupied by cloud as diagnosed by the model cloud scheme. This is for the whole atmosphere column as seen from the surface or the top of the atmosphere.

  2. Convective cloud cover

    0-6-2

    Fraction of horizontal grid square occupied by convective cloud as diagnosed by the model convection scheme. This is for the whole atmosphere column as seen from the surface or the top of the atmosphere.

  3. High cloud cover

    0-6-5

    Fraction of horizontal grid square occupied by cloud in the high-level cloud height range; from 5,574m (~18,000ft) to 13,608m (~44,500ft).

  4. Medium cloud cover

    0-6-4

    Fraction of horizontal grid square occupied by cloud in the mid-level cloud height range; from 1,949m (~6,500ft) to 5,574m (~18,000ft).

  5. Low cloud cover

    0-6-3

    Fraction of horizontal grid square occupied by cloud in the low-level cloud height range: from 111m (~350ft) to 1949m (~6,500ft).

  6. Cloud below 1,000 feet

    0-6-195 (local)

    Fraction of horizontal grid square occupied by cloud below 1,000 feet above sea level.

  7. Height of 2p5 oktas cloud base

    0-3-5

    Height of the base of the lowest cloud above sea level where there is at least 2.5 oktas (eighths) of cloud cover. This is also referred to as the altitude of the cloud base or (geometric) height above the geoid which is the reference geopotential surface. This corresponds to scattered cloud.

  8. Height of 4p5 oktas cloud base

    0-3-5

    Height of the base of the lowest cloud above sea level where there is at least 4.5 oktas (eighths) of cloud cover. This is also referred to as the altitude of the cloud base or (geometric) height above the geoid which is the reference geopotential surface. This corresponds to broken cloud.

  9. Cloud cover

    0-6-32

    Fraction of horizontal grid square occupied by cloud in layers centred on pressure levels.

  10. Convective cloud cover

    0-6-2

    Fraction of horizontal grid square occupied by cloud in the pressure range centred on the pressure level (from halfway between the level below and the current level and halfway between the current level and the level above)

  11. Cloud cover

    0-6-32

    Fraction of horizontal grid square occupied by cloud in layers centred on height levels.

  12. Convective cloud cover

    0-6-2

    Fraction of horizontal grid square occupied by cloud in the height range centred on the height level (from halfway between the level below and the current level and halfway between the current level and the level above)

  13. Fog fraction at 1.5m

    0-6-32 (mapped)

    Fog means a visibility of 1000 m or lower. The reduction in visibility is caused water droplets or minute ice crystals forming close to the surface. This quantity represents the fraction of horizontal grid square occupied by fog. An alternative interpretation is that this represents the fractional probability of fog being present at any location in the grid square. There is no WMO GRIB2 code for fog, it is mapped to cloud to aid usability.

  14. Visibility at 1.5m

    0-19-0

    Distance at which a known object can be seen horizontally from screen level (1.5m).

  15. Relative humidity at 1.5m

    0-1-1

    Fractional relative humidity (ratio of the partial pressure of water vapour to the equilibrium vapour pressure of water) at screen level (1.5m above the surface).

  16. Specific humidity at 1.5m

    0-1-0

    Specific humidity (mass fraction of water vapour in (moist) air) at screen level (1.5m).

  17. Relative humidity

    0-1-1

    Fractional relative humidity (ratio of the partial pressure of water vapour to the equilibrium vapour pressure of water) on pressure levels.

  18. Relative humidity

    0-1-1

    Fractional relative humidity (ratio of the partial pressure of water vapour to the equilibrium vapour pressure of water) on height levels.

  19. Pressure at surface

    0-3-0

    Air pressure at the surface (lower boundary of the atmosphere).

  20. Pressure at freezing level

    0-3-0

    Air pressure at the 0 degrees C isotherm (freezing level).

  21. Pressure at maximum wind speed level

    0-3-0

    Air pressure at level in the vertical where the maximum wind speed occurs.

  22. Pressure at tropopause

    0-3-0

    Air pressure at tropopause

  23. Pressure at convective cloud base

    0-3-0

    Air pressure at the base of the lowest convective cloud that diagnosed by the model convection scheme.

  24. Pressure at convective cloud top

    0-3-0

    Air pressure at the top of the highest convective cloud that diagnosed by the model convection scheme

  25. Pressure at mean sea level

    0-3-1

    Air pressure at mean sea level which is close to the geoid in sea areas. Air pressure at sea level is the quantity often abbreviated as MSLP or PMSL.

  26. Geopotential height

    0-3-5

    Height above mean sea level or altitude of the pressure levels. This is considered approximately equivalent to geopotential height. Geopotential is the sum of the specific gravitational potential energy relative to the geoid and the specific centripetal potential energy. Geopotential height is the geopotential divided by the standard acceleration due to gravity.

  27. Pressure

    0-3-0

    Pressure at the height levels. These are height above ground (model orography).

  28. Total precipitation rate

    0-1-52

    Instantaneous rate at which liquid water is being deposited on the surface. This includes rain, snow and hail with the ice phase precipitation being considered as a liquid water equivalent (lwe) value. It includes the contribution from the model convection scheme if this is invoked (true for Global models, but not the UK models) as well as that from the model precipitation scheme.

  29. Large scale rain rate

    0-1-77

    Instantaneous rate at which rain, produced by the model precipitation scheme, is being deposited on the surface. For the Global models (which run a convection scheme) the "rainfall rate from convection" must be added to this to get the total rainfall rate (this is not required for the UK models as they do not run a convection scheme). A scaling factor of 1000 is used to convert m s-1 (the units received from source) to kg m-2 s-1 (GRIB2 units)

  30. Large scale rain rate - 1 hour maximum

    0-1-77

    Maximum instantaneous rate at which liquid water equivalent (LWE) snow, produced by the model convection scheme, is being deposited on the surface in previous hour. A scaling factor of 1000 is used to convert m s-1 (the units received from source) to kg m-2 s-1 (GRIB2 units).

  31. Large scale rain rate - 3 hour maximum

    0-1-77

    Maximum instantaneous rate at which rain (as a depth) which has been produced by the model precipitation scheme was being deposited on the surface in previous hour. This excludes the rain produced by the the model convection scheme so for Global models (which invoke the convection scheme) this is not a maximum total rainfall rate.

  32. Large scale rain rate - 6 hour maximum

    0-1-77

    Maximum instantaneous rate at which rain, produced by the model precipitation scheme, is being deposited on the surface in previous 6 hours. This excludes the rain produced by the the model convection scheme, so for Global models (which invoke the convection scheme), this is not a maximum total rainfall rate. A scaling factor of 1000 is used to convert m s-1 (the units received from source) to kg m-2 s-1 (GRIB2 units).

  33. Convective rain rate

    0-1-76

    Instantaeneous rate at which rain, produced by the model convection scheme, is being deposited on the surface. A scaling factor of 1000 is used to convert m s-1 (the units received from source) to kg m-2 s-1 (GRIB2 units).

  34. Convective rain rate - 1 hour average

    0-1-76

    Mean rate at which rain, produced by the model convection scheme, is being deposited on the surface in the previous hour. A scaling factor of 1000 is used to convert m s-1 (the units received from source) to kg m-2 s-1 (GRIB2 units).

  35. Convective rain rate - 3 hour average

    0-1-76

    Mean rate at which rain, which has been produced by the model convection scheme, is being deposited on the surface in the previous 3 hours. A scaling factor of 1000 is used to convert m s-1 (the units received from source) to kg m-2 s-1 (GRIB2 units).

  36. Convective rain rate - 6 hour average

    0-1-76

    Mean rate at which rain, which has been produced by the model convection scheme, is being deposited on the surface in the previous 6 hours. A scaling factor of 1000 is used to convert m s-1 (the units received from source) to kg m-2 s-1 (GRIB2 units).

  37. Convective rain rate - 1 hour maximum

    0-1-76

    Maximum instantaneous rate at which rain, produced by the model convection scheme, is being deposited on the surface in the previous hour. A scaling factor of 1000 is used to convert m s-1 (the units received from source) to kg m-2 s-1 (GRIB2 units).

  38. Convective rain rate - 3 hour maximum

    0-1-76

    Maximum instantaneous rate at which rain, produced by the model convection scheme, is being deposited on the surface in the previous 3 hours. A scaling factor of 1000 is used to convert m s-1 (the units received from source) to kg m-2 s-1 (GRIB2 units).

  39. Convective rain rate - 6 hour maximum

    0-1-76

    Maximum instantaneous rate at which rain, produced by the model convection scheme, is being deposited on the surface in the previous 6 hours. A scaling factor of 1000 is used to convert m s-1 (the units received from source) to kg m-2 s-1 (GRIB2 units).

  40. Rainfall accumulation - 1 hour

    0-1-77

    Implied depth of the rain produced by the model precipitation scheme which has been deposited on the surface in the previous hour. For the Global models (which run a convection scheme) the “rainfall accumulation from convection” must be added to this to get the total rainfall accumulation (this is not required for the UK models as they do not run a convection scheme)

  41. Rainfall accumulation - 3 hours

    0-1-77

    Implied depth of the rain produced by the model precipitation scheme which has been deposited on the surface in the previous 3 hours. For the Global models (which run a convection scheme) the “rainfall accumulation from convection” must be added to this to get the total rainfall accumulation (this is not required for the UK models as they do not run a convection scheme).

  42. Rainfall accumulation - 6 hours

    0-1-77

    Implied depth of the rain produced by the model precipitation scheme which has been deposited on the surface in the previous 6 hours. For the Global models (which run a convection scheme) the “rainfall accumulation from convection” must be added to this to get the total rainfall accumulation (this is not required for the UK models as they do not run a convection scheme).

  43. Precipitation accumulation - 1 hour

    0-1-52

    Implied depth of the layer of liquid water which has been deposited on the surface in the previous hour. This includes rain, snow and hail with the ice phase precipitation being considered as a liquid water equivalent (lwe) value. It includes the contribution from the model convection scheme if this is invoked (true for Global models but not the UK models) as well as that from the model precipitation scheme.

  44. Precipitation accumulation - 3 hour

    0-1-52

    Implied depth of the layer of liquid water which has been deposited on the surface in the previous 3 hours. This includes rain, snow and hail with the ice phase precipitation being considered as a liquid water equivalent (lwe) value. It includes the contribution from the model convection scheme if this is invoked (true for Global models but not the UK models) as well as that from the model precipitation scheme.

  45. Precipitation accumulation - 6 hour

    0-1-52

    Implied depth of the layer of liquid water which has been deposited on the surface in the previous 6 hours. This includes rain, snow and hail with the ice phase precipitation being considered as a liquid water equivalent (lwe) value. It includes the contribution from the model convection scheme if this is invoked (true for Global models but not the UK models) as well as that from the model precipitation scheme

  46. Large scale snowfall rate

    0-1-56

    Instantaneous rate at which liquid water equivalent (LWE) snow, produced by the model precipitation scheme, is being deposited on the surface. For the Global models (which run a convection scheme), the "snowfall rate from convection" must be added to this to get the total snowfall rate (this is not required for the UK models as they do not run a convection scheme). A scaling factor of 1000 is used to convert m s-1 (the units received from source) to kg m-2 s-1 (GRIB2 units).

  47. Large scale snowfall rate - 1 hour maximum

    0-1-56

    Maximum instantaneous rate at which liquid water equivalent (LWE) snow, produced by the model precipitation scheme, is being deposited on the surface in the previous hour. This excludes the snow produced by the the model convection scheme so for Global models (which invoke the convection scheme), this is not a maximum total snowfall rate. A scaling factor of 1000 is used to convert m s-1 (the units received from source) to kg m-2 s-1 (GRIB2 units).

  48. Large scale snowfall rate - 3 hour maximum

    0-1-56

    Maximum instantaneous rate at which liquid water equivalent (LWE) snow, produced by the model precipitation scheme, is being deposited on the surface in previous 3 hours. This excludes the snow produced by the the model convection scheme so for Global models (which invoke the convection scheme), this is not a maximum total snowfall rate. A scaling factor of 1000 is used to convert m s-1 (the units received from source) to kg m-2 s-1 (GRIB2 units).

  49. Large scale snowfall rate - 6 hour maximum

    0-1-56

    Maximum instantaneous rate at which liquid water equivalent (LWE) snow , produced by the model precipitation scheme, is being deposited on the surface in previous 6 hours. This excludes the snow produced by the the model convection scheme so for Global models (which invoke the convection scheme), this is not a maximum total snowfall rate. A scaling factor of 1000 is used to convert m s-1 (the units received from source) to kg m-2 s-1 (GRIB2 units).

  50. Convective snowfall rate

    0-1-55

    Rate at which liquid water equivalent (LWE) snow, produced by the model convection scheme, is being deposited on the surface in previous hour. A scaling factor of 1000 is used to convert m s-1 (the units received from source) to kg m-2 s-1 (GRIB2 units).

  51. Convective snowfall rate - 1 hour

    0-1-55

    Mean rate at which liquid water equivalent (LWE) snow, produced by the model convection scheme, is being deposited on the surface in previous hour. A scaling factor of 1000 is used to convert m s-1 (the units received from source) to kg m-2 s-1 (GRIB2 units).

  52. Convective snowfall rate - 3 hour

    0-1-55

    Mean rate at which liquid water equivalent (LWE) snow, produced by the model convection scheme, is being deposited on the surface in previous 3 hours. A scaling factor of 1000 is used to convert m s-1 (the units received from source) to kg m-2 s-1 (GRIB2 units).

  53. Convective snowfall rate - 6 hour

    0-1-55

    Mean rate at which liquid water equivalent (LWE) snow, produced by the model convection scheme, is being deposited on the surface in previous 6 hours. A scaling factor of 1000 is used to convert m s-1 (the units received from source) to kg m-2 s-1 (GRIB2 units).

  54. Convective snowfall rate - 1 hour maximum

    0-1-55

    Maximum instantaneous rate at which liquid water equivalent (LWE) snow, produced by the model convection scheme, is being deposited on the surface in previous hour. A scaling factor of 1000 is used to convert m s-1 (the units received from source) to kg m-2 s-1 (GRIB2 units).

  55. Convective snowfall rate - 3 hour maximum

    0-1-55

    Maximum instantaneous rate at which liquid water equivalent (LWE) snow, produced by the model convection scheme, is being deposited on the surface in previous 3 hours. A scaling factor of 1000 is used to convert m s-1 (the units received from source) to kg m-2 s-1 (GRIB2 units).

  56. Convective snowfall rate - 6 hour maximum

    0-1-55

    Maximum instantaneous rate at which liquid water equivalent (LWE) snow, produced by the model convection scheme, is being deposited on the surface in previous 6 hours. A scaling factor of 1000 is used to convert m s-1 (the units received from source) to kg m-2 s-1 (GRIB2 units).

  57. Snow depth

    0-1-60

    Liquid water equivalent (LWE) depth of the snow lying on the surface (ground). Typically water is 10 times as dense as snow so multiplying by 10 gives an approximate depth of the snow, although wet snow can be significantly denser and powder snow much less dense. A scaling factor of 1000 is used to convert m (the units received from Science) to kg m-2 (GRIB2 units).

  58. Convective snowfall accumulation - 1 hour

    0-1-55

    Implied depth of the layer of liquid water equivalent (LWE) snow produced by the model convection scheme which has been deposited on the surface in the previous hour. The “snowfall accumulation” can be added to this to get the total snowfall accumulation.

  59. Convective snowfall accumulation - 3 hour

    0-1-55

    Implied depth of the layer of liquid water equivalent (LWE) snow produced by the model convection scheme which has been deposited on the surface in the previous 3 hours. The “snowfall accumulation” can be added to this to get the total snowfall accumulation.

  60. Convective snowfall accumulation - 6 hour

    0-1-55

    Implied depth of the layer of liquid water equivalent (LWE) snow produced by the model convection scheme which has been deposited on the surface in the previous 6 hours. The “snowfall accumulation” can be added to this to get the total snowfall accumulation.

  61. Snowfall accumulation - 1 hour

    0-1-56

    Implied depth of the layer of liquid water equivalent (LWE) snow produced by the model precipitation scheme which has been deposited on the surface in previous hour. For the Global models (which run a convection scheme) the “snowfall accumulation from convection” must be added to this to get the total snowfall accumulation. (This is not required for the UK models as they do not run a convection scheme).

  62. Snowfall accumulation - 3 hour

    0-1-56

    Implied depth of the layer of liquid water equivalent (LWE) snow produced by the model precipitation scheme which has been deposited on the surface in previous 3 hours. For the Global models (which run a convection scheme) the “snowfall accumulation from convection” must be added to this to get the total snowfall accumulation. (This is not required for the UK models as they do not run a convection scheme).

  63. Snowfall accumulation - 6 hour

    0-1-56

    Implied depth of the layer of liquid water equivalent (LWE) snow produced by the model precipitation scheme which has been deposited on the surface in previous 6 hours. For the Global models (which run a convection scheme) the “snowfall accumulation from convection” must be added to this to get the total snowfall accumulation. (This is not required for the UK models as they do not run a convection scheme)

  64. Diffuse shortwave radiation flux

    0-4-14

    Shortwave radiation at the surface from above directed at the ground. “Diffuse” means that the radiation has been scattered by particles in the atmosphere such as cloud droplets and aerosols. In accordance with common usage in geophysical disciplines “flux” implies per unit area called “flux density” in physics.

  65. Direct shortwave radiation flux

    0-4-13

    Shortwave radiation at the surface from above directed at the ground. ”Direct” means that the radiation has followed a direct path from the sun and is alternatively known as “direct insolation”. In accordance with common usage in geophysical disciplines “flux” implies per unit area called “flux density” in physics.

  66. Downward longwave radiation flux

    0-5-3

    Longwave radiation at the surface from above directed at the ground. In accordance with common usage in geophysical disciplines “flux” implies per unit area called “flux density” in physics.

  67. Total downward shortwave radiation flux at surface

    0-4-7

    Shortwave radiation at the surface from above directed at the ground. "Total" means the sum of direct and diffuse solar radiation incident on the surface and is sometimes called "global radiation". In accordance with common usage in geophysical disciplines "flux" implies per unit area called "flux density" in physics.

  68. Net shortwave radiation flux

    0-4-9

    Shortwave radiation at the surface from above directed at the ground. Net downward radiation is the difference between radiation from above (downwelling) and radiation from below (upwelling). In accordance with common usage in geophysical disciplines "flux" implies per unit area called "flux density" in physics.

  69. Upward longwave radiation flux

    0-5-4

    Longwave radiation at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) directed away from the ground. In accordance with common usage in geophysical disciplines "flux" implies per unit area called "flux density" in physics.

  70. Latent heat net flux - 1 hour average

    0-0-10

    Exchange of heat between the surface and the air by motion of air; also called “turbulent” heat flux. In accordance with common usage in geophysical disciplines “flux” implies per unit area called “flux density” in physics. Upwards is positive; negative is downward. Mean in the previous hour.

  71. Latent heat net flux - 3 hour average

    0-0-10

    Exchange of heat between the surface and the air on account of evaporation (including sublimation). In accordance with common usage in geophysical disciplines "flux" implies per unit area called "flux density" in physics. Upwards is positive; negative is downward. Mean in previous 3 hours.

  72. Latent heat net flux - 6 hour average

    0-0-10

    Exchange of heat between the surface and the air on account of evaporation (including sublimation). In accordance with common usage in geophysical disciplines "flux" implies per unit area called "flux density" in physics. Upwards is positive; negative is downward. Mean in previous 6 hours.

  73. Sensible heat net flux

    0-0-11

    Exchange of heat between the surface and the air by motion of air; also called “turbulent” heat flux. In accordance with common usage in geophysical disciplines “flux” implies per unit area called “flux density” in physics. Upwards is positive; negative is downward.

  74. Sensible heat net flux - 1 hour average

    0-0-11

    Exchange of heat between the surface and the air by motion of air; also called “turbulent” heat flux. In accordance with common usage in geophysical disciplines “flux” implies per unit area called “flux density” in physics. Upwards is positive; negative is downward. Mean in the previous hour.

  75. Sensible heat net flux - 3 hour average

    0-0-11

    Exchange of heat between the surface and the air by motion of air; also called "turbulent" heat flux. In accordance with common usage in geophysical disciplines "flux" implies per unit area called "flux density" in physics. Upwards is positive; negative is downward. Mean in the previous 3 hours.

  76. Sensible heat net flux - 6 hour average

    0-0-11

    Exchange of heat between the surface and the air by motion of air; also called "turbulent" heat flux. In accordance with common usage in geophysical disciplines "flux" implies per unit area called "flux density" in physics. Upwards is positive; negative is downward. Mean in the previous 6 hours.

  77. Upward UV radiation

    0-4-192 (local)

    Ultaviolet radiation at the surface directed away from the ground. In accordance with common usage in geophysical disciplines flux implies per unit area called "flux density" in physics.

  78. Downward UV radiation

    0-4-12

    Ultaviolet radiation at the surface from above directed at the ground. In accordance with common usage in geophysical disciplines flux implies per unit area called "flux density" in physics.

  79. Temperature at surface

    0-0-0

    Temperature at the surface interface between the air and the ground.

  80. Temperature at tropopause

    0-0-0

    Temperature at the tropopause

  81. Temperature at 1.5m

    0-0-0

    Air temperature at screen level (1.5m).

  82. Maximum temperature at 1.5m - 1 hour

    0-0-0

    Maximum instantaneous air temperature at screen level (1.5m) in the previous hour.

  83. Maximum temperature at 1.5m - 3 hour

    0-0-0

    Maximum instantaneous air temperature at screen level (1.5m) in the previous three hours.

  84. Maximum temperature at 1.5m - 6 hour

    0-0-0

    Maximum instantaneous air temperature at screen level (1.5m) in the previous six hours.

  85. Minimum temperature at 1.5m - 1 hour

    0-0-0

    Minimum instantaneous air temperature at screen level (1.5m) in the previous hour.

  86. Minimum temperature at 1.5m - 3 hour

    0-0-0

    Minimum instantaneous air temperature at screen level (1.5m) in previous three hours.

  87. Minimum temperature at 1.5m - 6 hour

    0-0-0

    Minimum instantaneous air temperature at screen level (1.5m) in previous six hours.

  88. Dew point temperature at 1.5m

    0-0-6

    Dew point temperature (temperature at which a parcel of air reaches saturation upon being cooled at constant pressure and specific humidity) at screen level

  89. Height at freezing level

    0-3-5

    Height of the 0 degree C isotherm (freezing level) above sea level. This is also referred to as the altitude of the freezing level or (geometric) height above the geoid.

  90. Height of wet bulb freezing level

    0-3-5

    Height of the wet bulb freezing level (i.e. where the wet bulb temperature is 0degC) above sea level. This is also referred to as the altitude of the wet bulb freezing level or (geometric) height above the geoid which is the reference geopotential surface. Wet bulb temperature is defined as the temperature of a parcel of air cooled to saturation (100% relative humidity) by the evaporation of water into it with the latent heat supplied by the parcel.

  91. Wet bulb potential temperature at 700hPa

    0-0-192 (local)

    Wet bulb potential temperature (temperature that a parcel of air at any level would have if starting at the wet bulb temperature, it were brought at a saturated adiabatic lapse rate, to the standard pressure of 1000hPa) on pressure levels

  92. Wet bulb potential temperature at 850hPa

    0-0-192 (local)

    Wet bulb potential temperature (temperature that a parcel of air at any level would have if starting at the wet bulb temperature, it were brought at a saturated adiabatic lapse rate, to the standard pressure of 1000hPa) on pressure levels

  93. Wet bulb potential temperature at 925hPa

    0-0-192 (local)

    Wet bulb potential temperature (temperature that a parcel of air at any level would have if starting at the wet bulb temperature, it were brought at a saturated adiabatic lapse rate, to the standard pressure of 1000hPa) on pressure levels

  94. Temperature

    0-0-0

    Air temperature on pressure levels.

  95. Temperature

    0-0-0

    Air temperature on height levels. These are height above ground

  96. Wind speed at 10m (surface adjusted)

    0-2-195 (local)

    Wind at 10m above the surface is defined as a two-dimensional (horizontal) air velocity vector with no vertical component. The speed is the magnitude of velocity. NOTE: This with “wind speed at 10m” replaces “x wind at 10m” and “y wind at 10m”.

  97. Wind direction at 10m (surface adjusted)

    0-2-194 (local)

    Wind at 10m above the surface is defined as a two-dimensional (horizontal) air velocity vector with no vertical component. In meteorological reports the direction of the wind vector is given as the direction from which it is blowing. NOTE: This with “wind speed at 10m” replaces “x wind at 10m” and “y wind at 10m”.

  98. Wind u-component at 10m (surface adjusted)

    0-2-192 (local)

    Wind at 10m above the surface is defined as a two-dimensional (horizontal) air velocity vector with no vertical component. The u component represents the horizontal speed of air moving towards the east.

  99. Wind v-component at 10m (surface adjusted)

    0-2-193 (local)

    Wind at 10m above the surface is defined as a two-dimensional (horizontal) air velocity vector with no vertical component. The v component represents the horizontal speed of air moving towards the north.

  100. Wind speed gust at 10m

    0-2-22

    Diagnosed instantaneous wind gust at 10m. This can be considered as the extreme rather than steady wind speed that might be experienced at this specific time.

  101. Wind speed gust at 10m - 1 hour maximum

    0-2-22

    Maximum diagnosed instantaneous wind gust at 10m in the previous hour. This can be considered as the extreme wind speed that might be experienced in this period.

  102. Wind speed gust at 10m - 3 hour maximum

    0-2-22

    Maximum diagnosed instantaneous wind gust at 10m in the previous three hours. This can be considered as the extreme wind speed that might be experienced in this period.

  103. Wind speed gust at 10m - 6 hour maximum

    0-2-22

    Maximum diagnosed instantaneous wind gust at 10m in the previous six hours. This can be considered as the extreme wind speed that might be experienced in this period.

  104. Wind speed at maximum wind speed height

    0-2-1

    Wind speed at level in the vertical where the maximum wind speed occurs.

  105. Wind direction at maximum wind speed height

    0-2-0

    Wind direction (from which blowing) at level in the vertical where the maximum wind speed occurs.

  106. Wind u-component at maximum wind speed height

    0-2-2

    Wind at maximum wind speed height above the surface is defined as a two-dimensional (horizontal) air velocity vector with no vertical component. The u component represents the horizontal speed of air moving towards the east.

  107. Wind v-component at maximum wind speed height

    0-2-2

    Wind at maximum wind speed height above the surface is defined as a two-dimensional (horizontal) air velocity vector with no vertical component. The v component represents the horizontal speed of air moving towards the north.

  108. Vertical wind velocity at 700hPa

    0-2-9

    Speed of the vertical component of the air motion at a pressure level. Upwards is positive and downwards is negative.

  109. Wind speed

    0-2-1

    Wind on a pressure level is defined as a two-dimensional (horizontal) air velocity vector with no vertical component. The speed is the magnitude of velocity.

  110. Wind direction

    0-2-0

    Wind on a pressure level is defined as a two-dimensional (horizontal) air velocity vector with no vertical component. In meteorological reports the direction of the wind vector is given as the direction from which it is blowing.

  111. Wind u-component

    0-2-2

    Wind on a pressure level is defined as a two-dimensional (horizontal) air velocity vector with no vertical component. The u component represents the horizontal speed of air moving towards the east.

  112. Wind v-component

    0-2-2

    Wind on a pressure level is defined as a two-dimensional (horizontal) air velocity vector with no vertical component. The v component represents the horizontal speed of air moving towards the north.

  113. Wind speed

    0-2-1

    Wind on a height level is defined as a two-dimensional (horizontal) air velocity vector with no vertical component. The speed is the magnitude of velocity.

  114. Wind direction

    0-2-0

    Wind on a height level is defined as a two-dimensional (horizontal) air velocity vector with no vertical component. In meteorological reports the direction of the wind vector is given as the direction from which it is blowing.

  115. Wind u-component

    0-2-2

    Wind on a height level is defined as a two-dimensional (horizontal) air velocity vector with no vertical component. The u component represents the horizontal speed of air moving towards the east.

  116. Wind v-component

    0-2-2

    Wind on a height level is defined as a two-dimensional (horizontal) air velocity vector with no vertical component. The v component represents the horizontal speed of air moving towards the north.

  117. Roughness length

    2-0-1

    Length-scale representation of the roughness of the surface equivalent to the height at which the wind speed theoretically becomes zero. Aka Surface Roughness

  118. Surface altitude

    2-0-7

    Altitude or (geometric) height above the geoid of the surface (ground).Altitude or (geometric) height above the geoid of the surface (ground). Aka Height of Orography and model terrain height

  119. Landsea mask

    2-0-0

    Binary indicator of whether a point is considered land (value = 1) or sea (value = 0).

  120. Boundary layer height

    0-3-18

    “Depth” or “height” of the (atmosphere) planetary boundary layer the part of the atmosphere whose behaviour is directly influenced by its contact with a planetary surface.